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Posts Tagged ‘“Morale”’

“Morale” ends with a spark and a bang, as we learn that psychological warfare works both ways.

Parts 6 and 7.

15:47.

You’ll notice how much stronger this story is than “Tanks”. A year or two can make a big difference in a writer’s skills — or an editor’s, for that matter.

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“Morale” continues, as Sergeant Walpole comes up with a plan, and Murray Leinster anticipates the feelings of many television viewers. (Really, an impressive act of extrapolation, in a story published in December 1931.)

Part 5.

13:56.

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“Morale” continues, as Sergeant Walpole takes a midnight ride into a battlefield.

Part 4.

13:25.

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“Morale” continues the saga of man vs. supermonstertank in the East Coast’s countryside. Sergeant Walpole continues his dogged attempts to report in, and my brother’s new kitchen appliances become relevant to the plot.


Part 3
.

11:57.

Another fascinating thing about old science fiction is the stark contrast between when people understood the uses of technology (and therefore thought its application was sure to be widespread in ten years), and when the technology actually became practical and widely adopted. Sometimes it just takes a while.

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“Morale” continues. Somebody doesn’t like people watching them. Not at all.

Part 2.

9:19.

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“Morale” is another military sf story by Murray Leinster. This one first appeared in the December 1931 issue of Astounding, and is set ten years later than “Tanks”, though apparently in the same universe.

We’re apparently still fighting the Japanese, too, though I still doubt that anybody Asian would be using the yellow imperial color for an ordinary flag. (Well, it’s not something most people would think about, and it worked as shorthand for his audience.) But really, the identity of the enemy doesn’t seem to have been all that important to either story, which is odd for the days of the “Yellow Peril” showing up tons in sf. (And really, that’s not fair. Japan was building up its military strength all during the early twentieth century, which was why military guys worried about it. It may have fed into racist fears, but Japanese militarism and expansionist imperialism was real.) As would become characteristic of Leinster, even when you meet the enemy face-to-face in “Tanks”, the enemy is made up of ordinary guys. Whatever causes the horrific nature of war, Leinster seems pretty clear that it’s not a matter of furriners being furrin. This makes his characters’ moral outrage at the events in “Morale” more effective, I think.

This story is divided up into eight short episodic parts by Leinster, with little fake quotes from his alternate universe’s histories to head each one. (We fans eat that stuff up. At least, I do.) So I’m recording it according to his scheme. It should make a nice set of short listens for people.

Part 1.

17:45.

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